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Texas Elementary School Students ‘Zoom Bombed’ With Porn for a Full Minute

zoom class porn

The teacher allowed the offending participant in because they used a student’s name.

Kids in an Austin-area 4th-grade class are now traumatized because of what they viewed.

When parents enrolled their children in remote school this year, they expected them to be safe. And while these students are less likely to encounter bullies, violence, or classmates or teachers infected with COVID-19, they apparently do still have to worry about Zoom bombing and unsolicited salacious videos, as one 4th grade virtual class in Leander, Texas, learned.

According to CBSAustin.com, River Edge Elementary’s principal, Shelley Roberts, sent a message to families about the incident, which took place on Thursday, September 10.

Even though Zoom allows teachers to decide whom to let into the meeting, they might only see a name of a user trying to enter the room, rather than a video of them. Any Zoom user can write anything for that name–it’s not automatically filled in with an email address associated with the account. So if a teacher sees a student’s name in the “waiting room,” they are likely to grant admittance to that account.

It’s unclear at this time whether someone unknown to the student obtained their name and used that to gain entry to the room or if the offender, say, a naughty older sibling, is someone who knows the 4th grader and just signed on from their younger relative’s device to carry out the harmful prank.

An Austin-area therapist shared with Working Mother that students are already showing signs of trauma after viewing the “hardcore porn.” Local mental-health professionals are mobilizing to assist those who have been traumatized.

This just highlights the security flaws in the video conferencing tools our schools are using to teach our kids. Password-protected rooms aren’t enough. From the school’s account of events, there is nothing that could have tipped off the teacher to prohibit that user from joining the room. And if the teacher couldn’t view all students’ videos at once, it’s easy for them to have missed the video one account out of dozens was displaying. It’s not clear whether the Zoom hijacker presented their screen to the whole class; that should’ve been easier to spot, and there are settings that teachers can select to prevent that. Still, video conferencing tools and schools need to do more to protect kids from viewing objectionable content while they’re learning. Without more resources during this unusual year, that might be tough to achieve.

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The teacher allowed the offending participant in because they used a student’s name.

Kids in an Austin-area 4th-grade class are now traumatized because of what they viewed.

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